HUMANE HAPPENINGS

 
 
The Owl prototype was made possible through a generous donation from the Arlene Heward Estate. The sculpture has been beautifully and meticulously painted by artist Abbie Hoogeveen. it will be available for viewing at our Shelter in Munster throughout the Owl Public Art Tour from July 15-October.

The Owl prototype was made possible through a generous donation from the Arlene Heward Estate. The sculpture has been beautifully and meticulously painted by artist Abbie Hoogeveen. it will be available for viewing at our Shelter in Munster throughout the Owl Public Art Tour from July 15-October.

OWL YOU NEED IS LOVE - OWL PUBLIC ART

Our mission is to lead the community in the humane treatment of all animals. We focus our efforts on needs in our community. This year, we are excited to announce a collaborative project with local businesses and artists to bring the good that we do to public light.  

Who: Humane Indiana is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization. This year, we are championing a public art project that brings together our organization with local businesses, schools, organizations, members and residents of the community, and artists.  Its goal is to bring awareness of our mission, commitment, and services to the community by way of OWL PUBLIC ART. Participation in the project will benefit animals at Humane Indiana’s Shelter and Clinic in Munster and services and educational programming at its Wildlife Education Center in Valparaiso.  

What: Through a wonderful partnership with Popa Heating & Cooling, Owner Pat Popa has led the design and production process of these magnificent owl sculptures. These four-foot high, 50 lb., fiberglass figures are a blank canvas for local artists to display and tout their creativity. Participants have the opportunity to purchase or sponsor an owl and work with a local artist on design of the sculpture. The figure prototype for the art initiative was made possible through a generous donation from the Arlene Heward Estate

Where: Once an artist has completed design of the owl, it’s ready to be displayed at the sponsor’s/owner’s location choice by July 15th. Owls that have been sponsored but not purchased, will be showcased at Owl You Need is Love Auction in November, where they will be auctioned as part of Humane Indiana’s fundraising efforts to support animals at our Shelter and Wildlife Center.   

When: We ask that all submissions for participation in the Owl Public Art Project be received by June 1st. Sculptures will be delivered to participants within 7-10 working days and finished, designed pieces should be displayed outdoors no later than July 15th for the entirety of the exhibit which runs through October 15th.    

Why: Humane Indiana offers a variety of services to ensure the welfare of all animals and wildlife. In 2018, our shelter admitted 2,352 animals, of which 2,093 were adopted, 70 were placed with rescues, and 49 were reunited with their families. We also trapped and neutered 157 feral cats, and our Wildlife Center in Valparaiso admitted 1900 wild animals. As our numbers demonstrate, our services are essential to animal welfare in our community. The Owl Public Art Project helps us to continue and grow these vital programs.    

How: Your participation in the Owl Public Art Project is simple. Once you have secured your submission and deposit for participation, production of your fiberglass owl will begin. During that time, you will plan and create the artwork for your sculpture with your selected artist. You may choose from our pool of artists or you may opt for an independent artist of your choice. The artwork will be submitted to Humane Indiana for approval, and once you have received confirmation to move forward, your artist may begin their work.   

We and the animals thank you kindly for your consideration and hope to have your  participation in this year’s Owl Public Art Project.  To receive a list of Sponsorship Levels or for questions regarding Owl Public Art, please email info@humaneindiana.org or call  219.513.8911 x103.

Your participation helps animals at our Wildlife Center.


pups help lcjc youths

Our commitment to the animals and our community reaches far beyond our animal shelter doors, and building partnerships within the region is always rewarding. We are excited to share this particular one with you. Thanks to Lake County Juvenile Court Senior Judge Thomas P. Stefaniak Jr., his idea to create an enrichment program for youths at the Lake County Juvenile Complex (LCJC), through a partnership with Humane Indiana, has come to fruition. Judge Stefaniak and Humane Indiana Shelter Director Jessica Petalas-Hernandez, have worked to offer a program that brings together incarcerated youths at LCJC and shelter dogs.

Judge Stefaniak had seen a lot of success with adult correctional institution socialization shelter programs. However, this program is the first of its kind, as it focuses on at-risk youths, ages 13-18, in a correctional-type juvenile facility. “Animals have a way of helping people lower their guard and open up about their feelings,” said Judge Stefaniak. “Our detained kids have an opportunity to help socialize the dogs and make them more adoptable; it benefits everyone,” he added.

Nearly 20 youths have already gone through the program since its inception last fall. “At risk youth learn proper animal handling, canine body language and positive reinforcement techniques,” said Petalas-Hernandez.  “It’s therapeutic for youth and opens up a pathway to an animal welfare career by giving them some experience,” she added. Humane Indiana Volunteers take between 4-6 dogs once a month to work with the youths at LCJC. If you would like to become a volunteer for the program, please contact us at humaneindiana.org.   .

Lake County Juvenile Court Senior Judge Thomas P. Stefaniak walks the halls of the Juvenile Center with family pet Moxie.

Lake County Juvenile Court Senior Judge Thomas P. Stefaniak walks the halls of the Juvenile Center with family pet Moxie.


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Community cat care by highland pd

“Community cats,” they scurry about our yards, alleys, and streets. We often times feed them, provide outdoor housing for them, or even credit them for minimizing the number of mice during the winter months. But how many, is too many neighborhood strays?

Thanks to a new partnership with the Highland Police Department, Humane Indiana is helping to control the stray cat population with a trap-neuter-release program, in the Town of Highland. The process includes Highland Police trapping cats, taking them to Humane Indiana’s Estelle Marcus Clinic, where they are sterilized and vaccinated, then returned to their community. “Healthy stray cats don’t need shelter resources,” said Jessica Petalas-Hernandez.  “Through the program, we can reduce the stray population by preventing unwanted litters, and control disease,” she explained.

The program was initiated by Highland Police Commander John Banasiak and was implemented in 2018. The Highland Police Department and the town’s Animal Warden are managing the program. “We are most proud of our new agreement in regards to the handling of feral and stray (community) cats and the Return to Field program,” Banasiak said. “We hope that this will make a big difference in our neighborhoods, and this partnership also improves upon the quality of life for our Highland residents as we can better serve our community needs regarding animals,” he added.

On Saturday, March 23, Commander Banasiak was recognized as one of Humane Indiana’s Humane Heroes at its 16th Annual Gala. We thank him and his team for working with us to to improve community cat care.